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BuzzFeed’s decision to publish a 35-page intelligence dossier about Donald Trump’s dealings in Russia set off a firestorm on Twitter that many of us wish we could un-see and also started a hearty debate over what journalism should look like in 2017.

From the start, BuzzFeed did inform readers that the information they were presenting was not verified. BuzzFeed’s editor-in-chief Ben Smith defended the decision to publish the report by claiming that it was an act of transparency.

“Our presumption is to be transparent in our journalism and to share what we have with our readers. We have always erred on the side of publishing.” -Ben Smith

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One of the greatest benefits digital publishing gives newsrooms is the ability to show the context of today’s stories in ways we have never been able to in the past. In print, there are only so many pages, and inch-counts dictate how much news and background information we can give readers. In radio and television, each story can only last a set number of seconds, which significantly limits the ability to give the audience an in-depth backstory.

In the digital world, not only can the text of a story be paired with photos, graphic elements and videos, but we have more opportunities to point our audiences toward relevant related stories that provide more details about the topic they are reading about. This can take several forms, but I’ll name just a few that I’ve seen used effectively.

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Riding a wave of anti-establishment enthusiasm, Donald Trump swept the swing states and the electoral college and the Republicans swept both houses of Congress. The victory baffled many in the political and media establishments who were unaware of how powerful the nation’s anti-establishment sentiment truly was.

While much has been written and will be written about this election and the mood of the country leading up to it, one thing is clear in the aftermath: Americans have lost faith in established institutions. A cursory glance at the social media activities of the president-elect’s supporters reveal that not only have they lost faith in the institution of government, but more painfully in the media as a whole.

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Marty Baron is the executive editor of The Washington Post. He is also the winner of this year’s Hitchens Prize, which is awarded to journalists and authors who’s work “reflects a commitment to free expression and inquiry,‭ ‬a range and depth of intellect,‭ ‬and a willingness to pursue the truth without regard to personal or professional consequence,” according to the Dennis and Victoria Ross Foundation’s criteria.

During his acceptance speech, Baron offered his view of the role and importance of journalism in the face of a president who may be more hostile toward the press than previous administrations.Below is the portion of his speech dealing with this topic as well as the full video of his acceptance speech.

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Last week, the method cable news broadcasts use to deliver headlines made headlines. While CNN host Jake Tapper was on vacation, a panel on his show was discussing a speech given by Donald Trump supporter Richard Spencer. The text on the bottom third of the screen read: “Alt-Right Founder Questions If Jews Are People.” This set off a firestorm that quickly got the attention of Tapper himself, who tweeted his disgust at the poor wording choice.

For the uninitiated, the text feature that runs on the lower third of the screen is called a chyron. While the name isn’t familiar to most, the frequent abuse of this feature and the all-too-frequent mistakes associated with it are well-known.This incident, along with some other recent examples, have brought the practice under scrutiny. Would cable news be better off without the chyrons?

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Tragedies often bring out the big difference in the depth of coverage provided by local and national news sources.

In the early hours of Friday morning, Demond Cottman was shot and killed in a Black Friday-related shooting in the parking lot of Hamilton Mall in Mays Landing New Jersey.

A Google search for the shooting immediately pulled up stories from the big national outlets like CNN, Fox and The New York Daily News. Their coverage was not bad by any means, but it lumped the story in with two other Black Friday shootings and gave scant details on the victim.

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Journalists are frequently accused of asking obvious questions of their sources. While it isn’t possible to speak for or defend some legitimately questionable questions, there are several reasons a journalist may intentionally ask what appears at first glance to be a “stupid” question.

JOURNALISTS CAN’T MAKE ASSUMPTIONS: Journalists try not to make assumptions. The wrong assumption can harm the journalist or news organization’s integrity and can lead to accusations of libel. Yes, journalists are capable of connecting the dots, but it is better for sources to make those connections. Sometimes, a journalist may ask what seems like a basic question to confirm what he or she has already pieced together.

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“Print is dead. I get all my news online now anyway.”

I hear this refrain all the time, or some other variation of it— and not just from the younger generation. It is a line used by longtime print subscribers when explaining why they don’t need their local newspaper anymore, as well as by hipsters who use the Wi-Fi at the local Starbucks as their gateway to all the world’s information.

In the information age, it seems everyone is either expecting— or even rooting for—the demise of the print edition.

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Breaking News: Local news stations, 24-hour news networks and news organizations on Twitter over-use the phrase “breaking news” to grab attention and increase ratings.

If your local broadcast news station somehow manages to have one “breaking” story at some point during the newscast every night, chances are the news they are reporting isn’t actually important to your life. More than likely, it is a fire, flashing blue lights at the scene of a crime, or celebrity news — all of which make good video.

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